Monday, December 29, 2014

CTI Christmas Party

 A very special time was had by all at our 2014 CTI Christmas Party.  From dancing CTI Elves, to CTI Elves-in-Waiting, to a visit from Santa Claus, there were so much fun that happened.  During the evening, the Dickerson Family, Sara Spery and Shekina DeTienne received special awards from the CTI family for all their help and dedication to the aims and goals of the CTI.  Also, Mr. Clayton Garner, 4th dan, received a plaque honoring his twenty years of training and teaching Moo Sul Kwan Taekwondo at the CTI.


Here is a special poem about this year's CTI Christmas Party, written by Ed Stanton of the Golden Campus, orange belt

‘Twas the week before Christmas
When all through the land
CTI students gathered
For a party so grand

They came bearing bags
Filled to the brim with good food
For families in need
From the neighborhood

This simple small gesture did seemingly say,
That we know and we care in our own Taekwondo way
The party was held at the perfect location
A church that is friendly, known as Faith Mountain

A pot luck was laid before all our eyes
With crock pots a plenty with goody surprise

More rapid then front kicks
The courses appeared,
All who were hungry had nothing to fear.

Oodles and oodles of dreamy desserts
Such as little black belted gingerbread men
Had us at the dessert table time and again

Following dinner was great entertainment,
Dancing would come; you couldn’t contain it.

But first we needed to know who they were,
Those Christmassy elves all dressed up in fur
                                                                
Introductions were given by Ms Meyung
And I’d swear they danced to Taguek Sam Chang

She named those in training
With the help of her buddy,
She and Mr Kikhia were really quite funny

With names such as "Stinky", "Sparkles" and such
We had a great laugh, it was a nice touch

Then music was played and the elves started dancing,
The music made fun, by the elves silly prancing

When what to my wondering eyes should appear,
It was Santa himself, without any reindeer

The elves started shouting and screaming and cheering
The place was a roar, it made hard of hearing

Sweaty the Elf shouted out “Santa”!
I think that he might have been hopped up on Fanta

The jolly old guy was dressed all in red,
He gave us a speech and we heard what he said
A peek at the crowd did surely show
That the kids where all happy, their faces aglow

He then made his way out to the grand entry way
Where kids lined up quickly to hear him say
If they were naughty of if they were nice
I bet some of those kids had to ask twice

The wife of old Claus was present as well
She stood their beside him looking real swell
The kids were delighted and couldn’t contain
The joy of her giving candy shaped like a cane

In the main room, the band started playing
Oldies but goodies is what I am saying

Ho-shin Motion they’re called, a band of great skill
Led by our chief, the Grand Master Sautel

They took turns singing and changing the lyrics
Of songs we know well which lifted our spirits

Mr Ondrejko delighted the crowd
With a jazz trumpet
Which he played oh so loud!

After the dinner and dancing and elves
My family and I had to excuse our selves
For late nights and parties are fun to enjoy
But we had to rest our girl and our boy.

On my drive home with no elf in sight, I heard Santa exclaim
“Merry Christmas to all, and to all a good night!”

Monday, December 22, 2014

CTI Spirit Wear


Start Your New Year with Your CTI Gear!


Available for a limited time only! spirit wear for the whole family. Place your order before January 5, 2015.

Youth Sizes Available:
XS (2-4), S (6-8), M (10-12), L (14-16) & XL (18-20)

Adult Sizes Available:
S, M, L, XL, 2XL, 3XL & 4XL

To place your order, follow these easy steps:

  1. Go to http://stores.inksoft.com/COLORADO_TAEKWONDO/Products
  2. Select item(s), choose the color and design.
  3. Purchase and pay for your item(s) on-line. Please leave your campus in the comment section for delivery.
  4. Stand by for distribution date and time.

Friday, December 19, 2014

New Years Resolutions

New Years is right around the corner and chances are adults, you're going to be using it as a reason to make some changes in your life. Lose some weight, get organized, learn something exciting, etc. According to statisticbrain.com, nearly 50% of American's make New Years resolutions each year. And, from the same study, nearly half will have given up after by the end of January and nearly two thirds will have quit within six months.

An article by Time Magazine says that, "only 8% of people who make New Year’s resolutions stick to them, and those who don’t usually abandon them after just one week." The reason, the article goes on to say, is that most people set unrealistic goals and don't have a good plan to reach their goals.

Fortunately, here at the Colorado Taekwondo Institute, we have a solution that will assists for many of your potential goals for this year. In each of our adult martial arts classes, including classes at our Golden location, we have goal driven instruction for each of our students.

When a person sees a class in action, they will see students with various colored belts, ranging from white to black belts, around their waist. This is an example of one of our goal systems. Students start at white belt and will have the goal of earning their yellow belt. Each class the black belt instructor will work with that student and help them learn and progress until they are ready to test for their yellow belt. The goals are reasonable and achievable for anyone. Student grow, learn and progress at their own rate and as they earn each belt they build self-esteem and confidence which makes each belt easier and easier to achieve.

Also, fitness goals are a no-brainier when it comes to classes at the Colorado Taekwondo Institute. All of our classes structured and action-packed; full of both aerobic and anaerobic exercises to burn fat, build muscle and will also develop flexibility. Countless adults have came into the program with New Years Resolutions in mind and ended up achieving their goals and going beyond what they ever thought they could possibly do.

No matter what has stopped you in the past, now might be the time to try it. For your physical health and mental health, joining the Colorado Taekwondo Institute, at any of our five locations, including the Golden location, could be the best thing you do for yourself this New Year!

Sources:
1- http://www.statisticbrain.com/new-years-resolution-statistics/
2- http://ideas.time.com/2013/12/30/new-years-resolutions-are-bad-for-you/
3- http://www.coloradotaekwondo.com/martial-arts-self-defense


Friday, December 12, 2014

Taekwondo and Developing Physical Fitness

By Nathaniel McKernan, 1st dan

The five components of health related physical fitness are improved through martial arts training at the Colorado Taekwondo Institute. However, we might as well ask the question, “What are the five components of health related physical fitness?”
They are:


All of these components of physical fitness are part of the Taekwondo training.

Now, just in case you didn't know, Taekwondo is a martial art which demands physical fitness and abilities in order to get good at the martial art.  You have to work hard and improve the body.  And, when you work hard at something like Taekwondo, you get a good workout.  And, to become even better at Taekwondo, you will begin the whole cycle again.  So as you work hard in Taekwondo classes at our Westminster location, you will improve the five components of health related physical fitness.

But how?  Well, let’s start with muscular strength.  In Taekwondo, we always do our exercises-- jumping jacks; push ups, etc. and these exercises help build up muscular strength over time.  But it is not just exercises that gives you muscular strength;  doing classes over a long period of time builds muscles.  Think about it, if you were to do kicks over and over again, or push-ups over and over again, you would build up muscular strength.  I myself can vouch for this.  When I first started, I could not do a single push-up (actually, for the first three years, I was doing a bad imitation of a push-up for building arm strength) and doing multiple amount of kicks made my leg muscles sore.  Now,  it’s a different story.  I can do push-ups and also do many kicks without my muscles being sore.  However, it took effort to get that strength.  Working hard in each class helped build muscular strength.

Now, what about muscular endurance?  What about the ability to keep your muscles going even when you are tired?  This is probably the easiest physical benefit you would achieve.   At first, it is difficult to keep one's muscles going during class because you have not developed very good muscular endurance yet.  Even really fit athletes sometimes have trouble because, odds are, they don't practice muscular endurance for all body muscles and Taekwondo uses all the body muscles.  However, over time, you will develop strong muscular endurance.  On that same note, you accomplish the same for cardio respiratory endurance.  For breathing, it would be very similar to muscular endurance; you would be able to breath better during long workouts then when you first started.  I am a living testimony.  When I first started, my muscles were aching and I was breathing hard after only 75 jumping jacks.  However, through years of continued participation, I am now able to do many more jumping jacks without breathing hard or getting sore muscles.  However, getting good at both does require you to try hard.  Just like muscular strength, the more effort you put in, the better you will get.

Next up is flexibility.  I am pretty sure you might have seen those gymnast be able to do those splits in mid-air and other feats and you probably thought “Could I ever be that flexible?”  Well, it is possible, and you can get it from continued participation in Taekwondo.  On your first day, you probably could not kick very high.  However, after continued participation, your kicks start to get higher, and higher, and higher.  Eventually, you would be able to kick so high that you would be considered “flexible.”  How?  Simple.  Stretching.  Every time we do class, we stretch to make ourselves more flexible.  And every time we stretch, our muscles extend a bit.  After a while, you would begin to realize that you are kicking a bit higher.  And, after more stretching, you would eventually be able to kick higher than you thought possible. This increased flexibility will also carry into other aspects of your life!

Last of all, there is body composition.  It is pretty much common knowledge that working out helps you get the best lean  body weight to fat ratio.  Well, Taekwondo demands physical exertion!  Or, in simpler terms, when you practice Taekwondo, you sweat.  That’s called a workout.  And when you workout, you get less fat.

So as you can see, classes at the Colorado Taekwondo Institute, including the Westminster location, does address all the five components of health-related physical fitness.  By doing Taekwondo, you can improve in all these areas.

Monday, December 8, 2014

Hanmadang Success!!


The 16th Lee H. Park Team Championships turned out to be the largest Moo Sul Kwan, AMASEA and CTI event of all time!

Taking place on December 6, at Alameda International High School in Lakewood, Colorado, this 6th CTI Hanmadang featured 335 students and instructors competing in exciting team and individual events!

This special once a year event honored the founder of Moo Sul Kwan and the AMASEA, Great Grandmaster Lee H. Park and our United States Veterans.

The participants displayed their Moo Sul Kwan martial arts skills in Team Poomse, Team One-step sparring, Team and individual breaking, Team Staff Poomse, Most Kicks in a Minute, Team Basics Demos and the CTI Basics Challenge.  At half-time, there was also a CTI Black Belt Club Demonstration that began with our CTI before and after school program students leading the way!

Here are the results!!

TEAM POOMSE

1st place
Black Panthers    Mountain Lions    Snow Leopards    Bengal Tigers
Bobcats        Cougars        Bobcats        Lions
Lions            Lions            Giant Cheetahs    Lions
Jaguars            Lions            Black Panthers    Clouded Leopards
Snowy Lynxs        Black Panthers    German Shepherds    Pumas
Lions

2nd place
Bobcats        Bengal Tigers        Black Jaguars        Pumas
Blue Panthers        Snow Leopasrds    Panthers        Siberian Tigers
Leopards        Lynxs            Jaguars            Cheetahs
Wildcats        Cheetahs        Bobcats        Siamese Cats
Cougars        Tuxido Cats        Maned Wolves    Snow Leopards
Osleths

3rd place
Cheetahs        Tabbys            Clouded Leopards    Snow Cheetahs
Lynxs            Lynxs            Golden Bobcats    Cheetahs
Panthers        Cheetahs        Cheetahs        Cheetahs
Panthers        Leopards        Tigers            Lynxs
Cheetahs        Lions            Jaguars            Korean Tigers

4th place
Leopards        Cheetahs        Bobcats        Orange Tabbycats
Leopards        Snow Leopards    Tigers            Mountain Lions
Lynxs            Black Panthers    Leopards        Ocelots
Lynxs


TIGER POOMSE

1st place
Trenton Wheat    Dale Arden        Forrest Braukhoff    Cy Harrington
Oliver Faler        Jack Gittleman    Enzo D'Alessandro    Matthew Hamel
Eli Henthorn        Cole Martin        Nash Politte        Dylan Wellenshek
Finn Kubista        Ella Horner        Jack Habetler        Isaac Roach
Carson Mack        Joseph Stano        Dominic Benavides    Jaxson Wheat
Halston Kuepper    Julian Strickland    Owen  King        Gaven DiNunzio
Allan Stanton        Cash Estes


TEAM ONE-STEP SPARRING

1st place
Cutthroat Trout    Angel Fish        Lion Fish        Spotted Trout
Tiger Sharks        Sting Rays        Blowfish

2nd place
Tiger Sharks        Salmon        Arctic Cod         Brown Spotted Trout  
Pufferfish        Goblin Sharks        Sea Pigs

3rd place
Barracudas        Wajil            Barracudas        Barracudas
Marlins        Tuna


CREATIVE BASICS    

1st place
Rottweilers        Panthers        Wolves        Bulldogs
Bulldogs        Chihuhuas        Red Wolves        German Shepards
Serval            Pitbulls

2nd place
Beagles        Golden Retrievers    Arctic Wolves        Timberwolves
Huskies        Pitbulls        Grey Wolves        Bull Dogs
Arctic Wolves        German Shepards

3rd place      
Bull Pogs        Huskies        Timberwolves        White Wolves
Wolves        Korean Jindos        Arctic Wolves        Arctic Foxes
Grey Wolves        Grey Wolves

4th place
Westwood Wolves    Bulldogs        Blue Heelers        Pugs          


INDIVIDUAL BREAKING

1st place
T.J. Tibbetts        Brecken Lusk        Gillian Boswell    Jovan Moore
Jake Grose        Nancy Fanning    Ed Stanton      


TEAM BREAKING

1st place
Scott/Dean        Wyngarden/Jensen    Field/Mitchell             Brancio/Salamera  
Bilyeu/Artman        Ma/Lincke        Lawlor/Hartmann    Mockingbirds
Red Robins  


BASICS CHALLENGE

1st place
Trenton Wheat    Gaven DiNunzio    Cole Martin        Jaxson Wheat
Derek Mershon    Zach Allen        Luke Vanni        Grady Burkgren
Joy Farr        Amethyst Whiney    Rylee Ross        Tabor Jensen
Bryar Chrismer    Joel Tate        Jack Weichert        Emily Chavez  
Aiyana Godwin    Taylor Allen        Mathias Bauer        Juliane Marine
Christian Lloyd    Zayne Lineberger    R.J. Larson        Mitchell Oleszek
Brynn Konrad        Meryn Probasco    Elijah Alire        Owen King

2nd place
Allan Stanton        Nash Politte        Carson Mack        Halston Kueper
Aubrey Schreiner    Kali Jensen        Aidan Sturm        Ruby Johnston
Evan O'Fihelly    Logan Rumph        Evalin Dickerson    Sydni Wilhelm
Thomas Brankin    Joshua Stencel        Tyler Cobb        Jacob Hoenmans
Noah Bolton        Reed Narva        Tatum Buenning    Zack Bickford
Nathan Tate        Mariah Cordova    Owen Martin        Olivia Henthorn
Kirk Otteson        Cody Jacobson    Colin Palminteri    Dylan


BLACK BELT TEAM STAFF POOMSE

1st place
Blue Spruce        Canadian Maples    Redwoods        Aspens

2nd place
Giant Redwoods    Palm Trees        Butternuts        Hickory

3rd place
Yellow Birch        Blue Spruce        Christmas Trees    Cottonwoods


MOST KICKS KONTEST

1st place
Finn Kubista        Dominic Benevides    Cole Martin        Jack Habetler
Derek Mershon    Kali Jensen        Luke Vanni        Greg Rodriguez, Jr.
Joy Farr        Amethyst Whiney    Rylee Ross        Kaylyn McEwan
Jack Weichert             Chance Keller        Joshua Stencel        Bryar Chrismer  
Mathais Bauer            Kylie Bickford        Aiyana Godwin    Brendan Arink
Osso Siddall               Max Bogdanoff    Owen Martin        Nathan Tate
Mitchell Oleszek        Brynn Konrad        Aydon Lewis        Peyton Beard
Lydia Willis               Justice De La Cruz    Dylan

2nd place
Trenton Wheat    Carson Mack        Matthew Hamel    Jaxson Wheat
Aubrey Schreiner    Zach Allen        Sebastian Popescu    Mia Bowerman
Grady Burkgren    Evan O'Fihally    Bowen Meyer        Amadeo Sandoval
Alaina Faler        Colston Yoder        Rusty Martino        Grant  Miller
Emily Chavez        Liam McCoy        Reed Narva        Grady Bahr
Zack Bickford        Nick Tibbetts        Brecken Lusk        Sean Haverkamp
Jasmine Salamera    Diesel DiPaola    Elijah Alire        Cody Jacobson
Robbie Crandell    Dylan Moga        Owen King

3rd place
Cy Harrington        Gaven DiNunzio    Forrest Braukhoff    Nash Politte
Cash Estes        Levi Burkgren        Theryn Ochsner    Sofia Laws
Lucah Meyer        Elaina Cassidy        Miah Daley        Pierce Drozda
Sydni Wilhelm    Aiden Seashore    Joel Tate        Ridge Blue
Tyler Cobb        Jacob Hoenmans    Lauren Dahlberg    Trevor Mershon
Tatum Buenning    Juliane Marine        Ben Techmeyer    Zayne Lineberger
R.J. Larson        Wiley Kueper        Sigourney Zager    Quinn Nesline
Chloe Churchill    Aodhan Linehan    Oliver Faler

4th place
Enzo D'Alessandro    Jack Gittleman    Halston Kueper    Ella Horner
Jesse Rainey        Mason Harrington    Conor McCarthy    Ruby Johnston
Riley Hagan        Logan Rumph        Evelin Dickerson    Jason Stencil, Jr.
Thomas Brankin    Ellie Stanton        Patrick Konrad    Everett Tompkins
Benson White        Noah Bolton        Taylor Allen        Alex Price
William Maes        Dean Gunther        David Malec        Anya Trilk
Olivia Henthorne    Kirk Otteson        Libby Girard        Colin Palminteri
Christopher Cardella    Eli Henthorn

Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Excellence from the CTI Monthly Homework

By Jennifer McKernan, 1st dan

As parents we want the best for our kids--the best education and the best experiences.  That's why we try to provide all kinds of opportunities for them to explore and experience, including various sport activities.  One of the most enriching one for us has been doing Taekwondo.  In taking martial arts, the kids gain physical fitness by learning the skill of kicking and punching and doing self-defense. They also experience competition and sportsmanship at the tournaments.  They gain mental training, with all the patterned movements, self-defense and one-step sparring drills they have to memorize and do, and also when studying the history, rules, and various aspects of Taekwondo for the written tests.  They learn and experience so much at Taekwondo!

But these are outside qualities.  As parents we can only do so much in taking them to classes and encouraging them to do their best.  Somewhere along the way, the desire to do well in Taekwondo, and to succeed in life, to achieve EXCELLENCE in whatever one does, has to come from inside.  What I didn't foresee, was how much the kids would learn about various qualities and values, and also experience character building and growth from the Colorado Taekwondo Institute (CTI).

Every month at Colorado Taekwondo Institute, including our Lakewood location, the students do CTI Excellence sheets.  These are either a worksheet for the younger students, or written assignments for teens and adults on various values and characters such as integrity, courage, responsibility, honesty, attitude, perseverance, respect, potential, dependability and leadership.  By completing these assignments once a month, the student earns a yellow stripe to go on the end of his or her belt.  5 yellow stripes equals 1 black stripe, so a student with one black stripe and 1 yellow stripe has done 6 assignments.  This also means that 6 months has gone by if all of the assignments were turned in each month.  The stripes on that particular colored belt can indicate how long that student has been at that belt color level.  Pretty clever way to glance at a student to see how long he or she has been at that belt level, and whether or not he or she has done her homework!  The stripes are important because it goes towards reaching the next belt level.

At first, the assignments seemed to take much time and thought.  How to explain "Integrity"?  What are some examples of "Random Acts of Kindness" you have done in your life?  And goodness gracious, do you admit in "Anger Management" that mom yells at the kids?  Sometimes we had discussions over them, and sometimes not.  As time went on, the kids did them more and more on their own and it became easier to do because they got used to thinking about them and doing them.  When life got very busy, sometimes it was enough "just to get them done" each month.  But somehow, over the years, doing these homework sheets and having similar discussions while at Black Belt Club, the character values had sunk in.  Just like a seed that is planted, watered, and then turns into a tree bearing fruit, I was pleased to see some of these qualities emerge!

During our recent black belt testing period, talk about perseverance and diligence!  There were a lot of requirements to get done along with the physical testing, and the kids did very well in completing them and not giving up.  Certain situations would arise and the kids would say, "Is that Integrity?"  or  "I really want to reach my full potential, so I think I should do this or that instead."  Really?  It could have been easy to take shortcuts or not to do one's best, but that's not integrity.  There has been such a huge leap in maturity in the kids, and even though it is difficult to tell if it was just because of the Excellence sheets,  I'm sure that all those homework assignments and discussions have helped.

Since writing this article I have been more aware of how everyday situations brings up issues of responsibility, leadership, follow-through, courage, and attitudes and how frequently and easily we discuss them.  The kids are open to growth in character and are very aware of these character issues.  It makes life much more pleasant and rewarding when everyone is trying to do their best and is courteous and supportive of each other. After all, these qualities are very much needed in life and helps one to succeed, too.  Gratitude is another topic covered, and right now I am very grateful for the Excellence Sheets and character building that we got to experience at the Lakewood location or the Colorado Taekwondo Institute.  Excellence in what is done on the outside comes from excellence of character on the inside!

Monday, December 1, 2014

16th Lee H. Park Team Championships


The 16th Lee H. Park Team Championships is THIS WEEK - December 6, at Alameda International High School!

This is a very special tournament honoring the founder of Moo Sul Kwan and the AMASEA, Great Grandmaster Lee H. Park.

This once a year tournament is our CTI Hanmadang.  It is our 6th CTI Hanmadang where students and instructors display their martial arts skills in poomse, one-step sparring, self-defense, special demonstrations and other events!

Unique to this tournament, is the team format that participants will follow during this exciting day.  Depending on the division, competitors may be on a team of three, four or even five people.  There are even two people teams in some competitions like black belt breaking or staff.  Other events include individual events like Most Kicks in a CTI Minute, or the CTI Basics Challenge.  All in all, a very exciting day for everyone involved!

The action begins on Saturday morning, and as always, there are no spectator charges for the family members and friends of our students and instructors!

Bring a camera and get ready to have a fantastic day!

For more information, speak with any CTI instructor.

Click here to see the 16th LHP Team Champs brochure.

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Smart Black Friday Shopping

By Erik Albrechtson, 5th dan

This past month the media has been filled with non-stop coverage about the upcoming Black Friday and Cyber Monday deals that will coming for consumers this next week. There is so much coverage about where to get the best deals and what the biggest sales, and it made me start to think: What is the best thing you could buy for a loved one?

Is is the latest electronic gadget (that will be obsolete by Black Friday next year)? Is is a new huge TV that will give you a reason to sit around and do nothing productive? Is it a new video game system? There's so many deals out there, what could possibly be the best deal.

But then I had a thought. Why not give them something that will really benefit them? Something that will never become out-of-date. Something that will get them off the couch and get them in shape. Something that won't be a game, but will be something productive in real life! The answer, for me obviously, is give them the gift of martial arts!

Classes at the Colorado Taekwondo Institute (with five metro campuses, including the Littleton location) are great for any of your family or friends. Students of all ages (2 to adult) and abilities (no martial arts experience needed) can come in, learn, get in shape and also do personal development.

Martial arts classes for kids has so many wonderful, life-long benefits. Kids learn focus, discipline, and respect while developing a strong work ethic and keeping their bodies moving. And classes at the Colorado Taekwondo Institute are taught in a structured, yet positive, environment. Instead of sitting at home playing games, they get to pretend they are the Ninja Turtle and do it for real. And again, they are developing good habits that will last them a lifetime.

And, of course, classes are great for adults too. Often students will be intimidated to start classes thinking they need some martial arts knowledge or that they need to be in good physical shape. But nothing could be further from the truth. Students start out a a white belt level and are taught everything from the ground up. Students have goals of techniques to learn and practice and as they develop they move higher in ranks. They are built from the ground up.

Also, students can be in any physical shape to begin. All of the classes are taught with the student in mind and can be tailored for each student's individual needs. Whether you're a stay-at-home mom, a tri-athlete, or someone who hasn't been to the gym since college, then you'll fit in perfectly at the Colroado Taekwondo Institute.

Give the CTI a call today to ask about a holiday certificate for a friend or loved one. We have five campuses in the metro area (including the Littleton location) to serve you. It's the best investment Black Friday deal you'll find!

Friday, November 21, 2014

Self Defense for Women Through The Colorado Taekwondo Institute

By Jocelyn Wallen, 1st Dan

It is a common stereotype that women are weaker than men and therefore more susceptible to to being taken advantage of physically. While it is sometimes true that men are physically stronger than women, it does not mean that they have to be more susceptible to violence. A study done by Jocelyn Hollander, a sociologist at the University of Oregon, showed that women who had taken a ten week self defense class were less than half as likely to experience unwanted sexual contact and more than twice as likely to avoid violent confrontation.

It was not only the self defense techniques that helped to empower these women but also their attitudes. It was shown in the study that women who had taken the self defense course were more likely to make eye contact and directly voice their objections to unwanted contact. This coupled with their knowledge of self defense helped them to feel safer and act in a safer way as well.

The self defense program at each of our schools, including the Conifer schoolThe Colorado Taekwondo Institute is geared not only to teaching traditional Korean Taekwondo self defense techniques but also toward teaching students important values such as respect and courage. This teaching model is all age encompassing for men and women ages two and up.

Along with the self defense aspect of the Colorado Taekwondo Institute the workout is also constructed to increase physical fitness. Physical fitness is a key factor in self defense because the healthy body has both greater agility and faster reaction times. It also contributes to body image and confidence. According to Hollander confidence and verbal resistance skills are the most important aspects of self defense. If a woman is going to say no with confidence she is much more likely to avoid the situation.

Self confidence is also built upon at the Colorado Taekwondo Institute. Self confidence contributes not only to a greater ability to defend yourself but also to achieving your personal goals. Confidence is required for everything from making friends to job interviews. CTI improves confidence through self discipline and leadership roles. The group environment of the classes allows a safe place for students to learn and improve on themselves. The class structure also allows for students to focus solely on themselves and their goals for the class period.

This type of class is beneficial for both men and women because everyone enters as equals. All curriculum is the same and no favoritism is shown. This allows for any type of person to succeed of their own accord. Motivation is the leading factor in advancement, meaning every new belt earned or technique learned is earned through hard work. The feeling achieved by earning your advancement breathes self confidence.

The Colorado Taekwondo Institute is the perfect place for women to explore both self confidence and self defense. With classes and programs at each of our schools, including the Conifer school, geared toward both, women can become both physically fit and mentally strong. Women of all ages can benefit from the workouts and benefits. With classes two or more times a week everyone can achieve their goals both in self defense and personal achievement.

Friday, November 14, 2014

Role Models

By Thomas Ma, 1st dan

Generally, role models are people who perform deeds that stick out to others and are among the hardest working people.  There are no shortages of these kinds of people at the Colorado Taekwondo Institute, Golden school.  Recently, I have come across quite a few role models at the CTI that have inspired me to be like them.  The three most common attributes that I've found between them were that they were all dedicated hard workers, were firm in their integrity, and that they were always fired up when going about tasks.  What is the big thing that pulls them all together?

I've noticed that as a student at the Colorado Taekwondo Institute, it isn't uncommon to look up to a black belt.  I can see why fairly clearly; CTI Black Belts are very hard workers.  When testing for their black belt at our school, they throw a lot of back into their training.  Day in and day out, the student testing for their black belt is thinking about how to get physically prepared for the, understatedly, rigorous six hour physical test they must do to show if they are ready for a Moo Sul Kwan black belt.  On top of the physical test, a written test demands just about everything the student has learned since white belt about the art and ways of our martial arts training and traditions, which adds up to an extremely large list.  Moo Sul Kwan Taekwondo practitioners that wear a well-deserved black belt have proven to best this testing process while at the same time leading their life outside of Taekwondo.  This goes to show that Moo Sul Kwan Taekwondo black belts are very dedicated and hard workers.  I have never met a black belt at our school who doesn't know how to give 100% in anything they do.  Since they always do their best working out, a lot of students look up to them.  In my opinion, it’s easy to have a Colorado Taekwondo Institute black belt as a role model at our school because of how much they do, what they do, and how they do it.

Most if not all of my role models are not only hard workers, but they always have a great sense of right and wrong and know the right thing to do in most any situation.  They have a big set of characteristics that set them apart from the crowd, one characteristic of the set being integrity.  Integrity in a nutshell is honesty at all times, and an adherence to moral codes or a firmness in moral beliefs.  The thing that makes it or breaks it when looking for things in a role model is more often than not integrity, I've noted.  When people are dishonest or do morally wrong things, it is difficult to look at them through a good lens.  Therefore if someone is honest and has integrity, they are most easily viewed upon as a good role model.  Lucky for us students at the CTI integrity is one of the tenets of Taekwondo which we, as a whole organization, follow very closely.  As students, integrity in our training is very important, it is the maintenance check we always give ourselves when we find new things to work on in our training.  Integrity is taught by our instructors a numerous amount of ways.  One way being about school work.  Since school work is a big priority, instructors stress to students that school comes first before Taekwondo.  When a student is struggling to get homework from school done at home, instructors at Taekwondo are very keen about finding ways to get it done.  After all, who learns, leads.  Especially as a role model.

The last quality that I have found most common throughout the many recently found role models is that they are always fired up.  If you've never had a workout partner before, my advice to you is to find someone who is very enthusiastic to work out with.  At Taekwondo, my role model when working out is a black belt who goes at it.  People who are always fired up are the best people to work out with.  When working out with enthusiastic people, it’s as if a mysterious and usable energy radiates off of them.  I guess that in a way, I myself want to be a role model of the sort where I can influence others to get pumped for the sole reason of being by their side working out with them.  A role model of mine just makes me so powerful when he does it.

At the Golden school of the CTI, role models are anything but scarce.  Since I have found that role models are all hard workers with dedication, integrity, and the ability to get fired up at will in common, I’ve come to the conclusion that Taekwondo makes role models.  Taekwondo is the big thread that connects all the dots.  From becoming a hard worker with dedication and integrity, to the ability to be a very enthusiastic worker; Taekwondo teaches them all.  Taekwondo teaches its students to be hard working people that are dedicated, that have integrity, and that have the ability to get fired up right-off-the-bat when they need to be.

Friday, November 7, 2014

Driving By and Wondering "What is Colorado Taekwondo?"

By Ian Randall, 1st dan

When someone drives past the one of the schools of the Colorado Taekwondo Institute, including the Westminster school, and sees "Taekwondo” they probably don’t think much of it, or think of the typical martial arts stereotypes. This can be expected, as the deeper benefits of Taekwondo cannot be seen unless experienced for an extended period of time. They do not envision how Taekwondo could help with concentration, balance, eye hand coordination, or even dealing with certain disabilities.

When I first started Taekwondo, I did not see these hidden benefits, and did not for a few years. The aspects of Taekwondo that I have benefited the most from have been balance, strength, and hand eye coordination. These have assisted me most with basketball.

In Moo Sul Kwan Taekwondo, there is a large variety of kicks which require balance, control, and concentration. The act of rising out of a front stance, pivoting the front foot, locking out a side kick, and re-chambering the kick without stumbling is challenging and demands these skills. These skills are not only applicable in Taekwondo, but in basketball as well. Being able to dribble full speed, stop on a dime, and shoot a jumper with a hand in your face is very difficult and demands great body control. Practicing the basic kicks of Taekwondo consistently over the past 11 years has given me the ability to do this. They have given me the balance to stop on a dime, the body control not to fade away from the basket once I am airborne, and the concentration to remain poised and focused on the basket with a defender inches away.

Taekwondo has also helped me with core, upper body, hand, and leg strength. The sit-ups and abdominal work we do every class helps with balance on kicks and tight stomachs in breaking. The tricep push-ups give us great upper body strength and help improve speed on our punches. Fingertip push-ups strengthen the fingers, enabling us to have tighter han
ds. Holding low stances in basics and poomse also help with leg strength. All of these benefits are needed in basketball as well. The abdominal and upper body strength helps me get past a more physical, larger, and more athletic defender. The hand and finger strength enables me to have a better grip on the ball while helping prevent jammed fingers. The added leg strength makes me more explosive while preventing fatigue after I have been in a low stance for an extended period of time.

Taekwondo has helped me improve my hand eye coordination as well. In Taekwondo, hand eye coordination is demanded for punches, kicks, or hitting an exact target in sparring or breaking. This is easily translated into skills needed in basketball such as: ball handling, shooting, catching, and throwing on target passes.

Moo Sul Kwan Taekwondo has countless benefits, but it’s easy transition of skills from sport to sport is very obvious. Moo Sul Kwan Taekwondo and it’s time tested routines have given me balance to be the shooter I am today, the strength to be faster and more explosive, and the eye hand coordination to be a great ball handler as well.

So the next time you drive past the Westminster school of the Colorado Taekwondo Institute martial arts school, think of one of the positive aspects training can give you or a family member.

Wednesday, November 5, 2014

16th Lee H. Park Team Championships

Our 6th CTI Hanmadang!


The 16th Lee H. Park Team Championships is on December 6, at Alameda International High School!  This is a very special tournament honoring the founder of Moo Sul Kwan and the AMASEA, Great Grandmaster Lee H. Park.

This once a year tournament is a CTI Hanmadang.  Students and instructors display their martial arts skills in poomse, one-step sparring, self-defense, special demonstrations and much more!  A big difference in this tournament is that participants compete on teams.  Depending on the division, competitors may be on a team of three, four or five people.  There are even two people teams in some competitions like black belt breaking or staff.  There are also a few individual events like Most Kicks in a CTI Minute, or Basics Challenge.  All in all, it's a very exciting day for all ages and belt levels!

The action begins on Saturday morning, and as always, there is no spectator charge for our family members and friends of our students and instructors!  Bring a camera and get ready to have a fantastic day!

For more information, speak with your instructor.

To see the 16th LHP Team Champs brochure, click here.

Monday, November 3, 2014

Anger Management

By Nancy Fanning, blue belt

We've all been there…someone pushes our buttons, our day doesn't go as we’d hoped, the kids are whining, dinner gets burned…something sets us off and we want to lash out.  The easy way out is just to lose control.  Yell, throw a fit, throw an object, and maybe even hit something.  Those are the easy choices, but not the correct ones.

A smarter option would be to go to CTI Taekwondo.  First, it’s a great workout.  The warm up of jumping jacks, sit-ups, push-ups, and stretching releases endorphins that help improve your mood.
Then there are basics and kicks.  In your mind, you can imagine the problem standing right in front of you and focus your punches and kicks to destroy the problem.  During poomse, you can also imagine you are battling the day's issues and defeat them!  If sparring happens to be a part of class that night, you can really let loose the anger and frustration from the day while practicing your sparring skills.

If the physical aspect doesn't help change your mood, there’s the mental aspect.  It’s very important during class to keep focused and pay attention.  If you lose your focus, you miss important information that your instructor is telling you.  He might be correcting a stance or he might be giving you new moves on your current poomse.  Either way, you better be on your game and paying attention to all the direction he’s giving.  It’s your time to forget your outside worries and concentrate on improving yourself during the duration of class.

Whether you go to CTI Taekwondo for the physical side, the mental side, or just the all around workout, it’s a great place to take yourself to turn frustrations of the day into positive energy.  On the offhand chance that’s not enough to turn your day around, there’s always your Taekwondo family there to help put a smile on your face.  Taekwondo has helped me turn many bad days around and been an amazing outlet.  For me, the days that I feel the most beat down will usually end up being my best workouts.  It’s good to know that I have a positive and supportive place to go to take pent up anger and turn it into a strength to better myself.  

Friday, October 31, 2014

My Moo Sul Kwan Journey So Far

By Irene Kim, blue belt


My nerves began to manifest deeply as I stepped onto that light brown carpet at the Littleton school for the first time. A black belt took me aside and started to show me the footwork of the 4 directions that I would need to know. I tucked my hands behind my back and followed his every move, trying to ignore the uncertainty of this unknown.

I had given birth to my second child 5 weeks prior and sought to regain my physical strength in something new. I had practiced cardio-kickboxing for 6 years, though it was not considered a true Martial Art. I was intrigued and interested in the more formal taekwondo from a cultural as well as personal perspective.

As the weeks, months, and years have progressed, I am finding a strength of mind, body and spirit that I did not know existed within me. I was raised by a severely conservative father who escaped northern Korea (before it was formally North), then survived the Korean War. Ironically, he practiced the original taekwondo, without uniform, in the woods of Korea, though warns me not to go "too hard" practicing the art now. My mother was from Seoul and also survived the War. Both raised me to not be competitive, so I did not seek out sports growing up. Indeed, the apprehension of competition is a strong part of me even now.

Taekwondo supports students competing not with each other so much as within themselves. I value this. I recall Master Sautel telling us prior to a tournament, "Don't tell me you got first place; I don't want to know." This resonates with me; In any competition with which I have been involved, my biggest fear had always been to not let others down (e.g., teammates or coaches).

I value our taekwondo instructors support of each one of us. As our uniforms and lack of ornamentation due to etiquette indicate, we are all equals, regardless of age, gender, height, size, rank in society or profession.  Those initial nerves and uncertainty are still with me as I learn and practice, though to a far lesser degree in large part due to the CTI instructors and their respect of all individuals who practice the art.

Through the practice of taekwondo, I feel a sense of confidence growing in areas I did not know I possessed. I have confidence in my role as mother and professional in caring for others.  I am strong in sensing others' needs before they are even aware of them and making others smile in doing so, but I have never held a lot of confidence in my physical strength. I have always been relatively good at cardiovascular aerobic exercise (running races, tri-athalon, swimming), though have not considered myself to be an athlete or physically strong. Taekwondo pushes me to be strong in all ways (physical, mental spiritual, emotional) and while it is a struggle sometimes, I sense the benefits.

Though the demands on my life do not allow me to attend class more than a couple times per week, the feelings I have at the completion of the adult class every week stay with me: Pride, accomplishment, success, growth (in strength, power, confidence) and ultimate stress-relief. I learn every single class. While my strength grows, however, I am always extremely humbled by each and every student, instructor and Black Belt in the organization. As I was told early on in my training, 'Attaining Black Belt level is only halfway through.' There is so much to go.

But life is a journey, not a destination. My journey in taekwondo is a series of ascending steps that I climb each week. Sometimes it is a mental climb, as when I rehearse in my mind what I learned. I will sit with a snack or dinner after class and reflect on key points that I need to improve on. I will make notes and flashcards to instill in my mind as I physically take a step and attain higher and higher levels by practicing. The top of my taekwondo staircase is so far up that it is not visible to me; I do not know if I will attain Black Belt. This is not a concern to me. I am practicing taekwondo for very personal reasons, including being a role model for my daughter (a 6-year-old striped green belt who has earned a total of 7 belts since becoming a Tiger!)

Above all, the power of taekwondo has made me a better person. I am honored to know and practice with such outstanding individuals, such positive role models in a society so unfortunately filled with negativity and doubt.  I am surrounded by positivity, respect, and health each time I step in the door to the Littleton school of the CTI. To persevere is the goal for me and my daughter, despite numerous other responsibilities pulling us in different directions (as every CTI student has).  Through many different avenues and now including taekwondo, I know for certain that hard work pays off. Push through, I tell myself, and the power will only keep growing.

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Balance and Taekwondo

By Allyse Nothstine, red belt, age 14

Many aspects of life require balance which can be taught through Moo Sul Kwan Taekwondo. Balance is necessary for people of all ages, because it can help prevent falls and injuries.  Studies have done specific studies on the effects of balance from doing Taekwondo, specifically for the elderly and young children with physical disabilities.  Balance is also highly important for Taekwondo moves.

One study done was people from ages 40-71.  Once a week for an hour, for a one year, Taekwondo was done.  Data showed that Taekwondo training improved people’s overall balance, posture, showed improvement in which way their body sways, and more control on how they fell.  The basic stances and foot work was shown to help with balance.

Another study was done with people in their 70’s.  It was to find out if it improves their balance and walking ability.  Taekwondo exercise was effective for improving balance and walking.  They attribute that to the specific movements required to do taekwondo.  Taekwondo training can decrease the likelihood of falls in the elderly.

In another study about children with developmental coordination disorder. The 44 children did three months of basic Taekwondo training.  Three months of training improved their visual coordination and improved their standing balance control.  People working with these children can suggest Taekwondo be a therapeutic fun activity.

In Taekwondo there are spins, jumps, and more complex moves.  But in order to hold the moves and do them correctly one needs to develop balance.  In order to stabilize the body the core has to be strong.  Studies have shown Taekwondo helps improve balance for children and elders, which can be used in many aspects of life. At the same time, balance is incredibly important in the art of Taekwondo itself.

Friday, October 24, 2014

Taekwondo and a Shy Personality

Taekwondo is a sport that is healthy for your body and mind. The sport itself has an abundance of positive aspects for who ever wants to make martial arts a part of their life.

Being shy is an example of one of the many things that Taekwondo can help improve. Shyness can make some activities more difficult than others. I can relate because I have a shy disposition. For example, say you're taking a group test at school. After seeing the next problem, the majority of the group decides on an answer that you don't agree with. But you realize that you are the only one in  the group that thinks differently. You disregard your opinion out of the fear of being made fun of. Shyness just took a point off your test score! Learning Taekwondo can be a positive tool to help yourself to be a little more outgoing and to have more confidence in your actions and personal growth.

Joining Taekwondo can make a positive step in overcoming your shyness. When working in teams at a Moo Sul Kwan tournament, you can't remain on the side lines and not participate. Even if you are to fail your team still receives more points than if you didn't do anything. Your Taekwondo peers will respect your opinion during group discussions as well. There are no stupid questions.
     
The higher you rise up in the rankings there will come a time when you are asked to share your knowledge on a subject to a lower belt. Whether it be a poomse, one steps, or self defense you need to be the teacher. I know personally the very first time I was asked to help a yellow belt on their Chongi poomse I was terrified. But like practicing your self defense or riding a bike, the more you do it the more confident you will be.  Remember to the lower belt you are the teacher right now. You have been doing Taekwondo for a longer period of time and have already passed the point where they are now. They have no reason to doubt someone who has experience with what they are teaching. After all respecting your teachers is one of the MSK rules of etiquette. Your MSK training will help you set goals, reach goals, and advance in rank.

The Taekwondo environment is an interesting one. Of course the first time someone ever steps foot inside one of the different school locations they might notice the bulletin board where all the upcoming events are posted. The walls are decorated with all of the belts white to black. You might be thinking “Wow, I wonder how long it will take ME to become a black belt? But how is a shy person like me going to fit in?”

Sure that first time inside the school can be a little intimidating but after your first lesson you can start to notice something different. MSK Taekwondo has a very friendly atmosphere. Even if you are just stopping by our Lakewood school to check out who we are a black belt will greet you with a smile and talk to you about what we do here.

Shy personality or not it would be quite difficult for one not to make friends at MSK Taekwondo. Whether it be from a social event like the yearly trip to water world or a lock in at the campus. Also special events like MSK summer camp or one of the many tournaments you participate in during the year. Its certain that you will find someone to talk to. Plus having a friend you can look forward to support while you are learning new things. For me, this makes going to classes at our Lakewood Taekwondo school that much more enjoyable.

Each new thing I learn at Taekwondo makes Tournaments more enjoyable. We get to show what we have learned and with my friends it turns into a friendly competition. Since we are in the same age and belt group we usually compete against each other. One Friend beats be in regular sparring, I beat him in first point wins. Another wins the staff poomse division for their better form, but I place higher in regular poomse for my superior power.  It can go back and forth. But it makes practicing my moves at home and in class more interesting with the motivation to place better than my peers. You learn as a white belt about good sportsman ship. Even if you don't do well in an event no one is going to brag or make fell bad for not doing better.

In conclusion, the positive aspects of Taekwondo can help improve social skills, confidence, and encourage higher self esteem. Being shy will no longer hold you back. You can face the world with your head held high!

Monday, October 20, 2014

Champion

By Emily Artman, purple belt, age 11

Suddenly, golden beams of sunlight peeked through the glass door and momentarily blinded me.
Our voices echoed off the walls as one hundred eyes pierced my skin.

The cold air at Snow Mountain Ranch came rushing into my lungs as though it wanted me more than I wanted it. I looked out over the grassy field, a single picnic bench dotting the horizon. The snow-capped mountains sparkling in the distance. I could feel every crack and splinter of the aged, wooden deck beneath my feet. Anticipation hung heavy in the air as each group prepared to showcase the Martial Arts demo they had been working and practicing on all week.  As we took our places I was the second in line. I walked into the small room of the Leget building, falling into step with the others in my group.  When I lined up in formation I let out a breath I didn't know I was holding in.  I tried to look confident, but my insides were doing back-flips.

I heard my uniform snap, my voice echo, and could feel the rapid beads of cool sweat rolling down my neck, back, and forearms.  Time slowed each punch crisper and more precise than the one before.

It seemed like hours before we transitioned into our next formation.  My body was working on autopilot and executed each move perfectly, without thought.  As hard as I tried to suppress it, I could not ignore the hundreds of eyes staring at me. Suddenly, golden beams of sunlight peeked through the glass door and momentarily blinded me.  My heart skipped several beats. My brain seemed to have stopped working.  That moment of warmth from the sun had cost me dearly.  I panicked; my heart was beating out of my chest, had I forgotten everything?  No, after that moment of utter terror the sun disappeared behind it’s cloud and I was able to fall back into step.  Could everyone tell?

We finished on final kihap, the sound full of perseverance, indomitable spirit, and integrity.  I stood there not daring to move an inch, my face lined with sweat.  Breaths were coming fifty at a time.  Then... Applause filled the room like thunder.  I could feel a smile tugging at the corners of my mouth while my spirit soared. I kept my face emotionless as we accepted our applause and left the floor.

Friday, October 17, 2014

MSK Taekwondo: My Own Experience

By Emily Brophy, 1st dan

Taekwondo is a very beneficial sport for many reasons, and it helps with other activities such as school, singing, and acting. Because of the self-control and self respect that Taekwondo teaches, it is easier to be more involved in acting, or other forms of public performance. Public speaking is a very important part of everyday life, whether it is presenting in front of a class or acting in a musical or play. It can be very difficult for some people to present in front of people, participating in Taekwondo can provide the courage, and self confidence needed to be comfortable and good at public speaking, and acting. Because of the basics, poomse, and tournaments that go on at Taekwondo the self-confidence of the students is boosted. The boost of self-confidence helps in presenting in front of people, and acting, this can be an important skill for everyday life, and in jobs.

When I first started at the Colorado Taekwondo Institute when I was 5, I was a very shy and not a very outgoing and personable person. I was also a piano player, which made it extremely for me to perform in recitals in front of people. I was unable to even introduce myself to the audience, and I was unable to perform. As I grew older, when I turned 7, I began to sing as well as play the piano, it was very nerve racking for me to play and sing in front of people. But as I became more into Taekwondo it was much easier for me to be able to sing in front of people. Taekwondo also helped me with acting as well, being in theater and having to act and sing in front of people as a different person, is a skill that takes time to perfect, and needs lots of self confidence. As well as performing a play or musical in front of an audience there are actor building games that are played. Some of these games can require a person to make a bold choice in character and then not break character, while performing a scene.  This can be  extremely hard for a shy person to find, and then trying to perform in front of people, can make it impossible for anything to be accomplished.

The way that the classes are taught, it requires class participating and practicing poomse in front of people. At first this can be a very difficult thing to accomplish, but as time goes on it becomes easier to be able to be self-confident.  During these classes also the students are taught about self-control and this also relates to acting, singing, and playing an instrument. Playing an instrument or acting in a show, requires a huge amount of practicing, and commitment. First learning how to play and instrument or keeping up playing on, can be a difficult and time consuming thing. One thing that is difficult for most people is wanting to practice on a regular basis. It takes a huge amount of self control to maintain a regular practice pattern. Playing a part in a musical or play whether it is a lead or a member of ensemble it a huge responsibility and requires a huge amount of rehearsal and practice time.  Being in a musical and being a member of ensemble is huge, depending on the amount of company music that there is and how much the ensemble is participating in, there can be a huge amount of dance steps to learn. The ensemble is the most important part of the play and it requires a huge amount of practice time to keep up with all of the new choreography.

Because of the self-control that is taught at Taekwondo, it makes it easier for me to be able to find the practice time to be part of a musical, or to be able to be a good performer when I sing and play the piano. During my recitals now I have found that I own the stage and I can do it if I put my mind to it. Taekwondo has been such a huge part of my life and it has helped me immensely to get me to stage I am now in performing and in life. I found it so much easier to  be who I am and talk to people without becoming nervous. During my last year in middle school, I was required to do a speech stating why I was ready to move on to high school. This speech was held at a dinner with the rest of the people from my class, and their families. About 100 people showed up to this dinner, and I knew that if I had not participated in Taekwondo I would have not been able to speak in front of all those people.

Monday, October 13, 2014

MSK Black Belt Symposium Stays on the Crest

The 19th MSK Black Belt Symposium was a tremendous weekend of education for our Moo Sul Kwan upper belts!  A Symposium record number of  instructors and assistant instructors converged at the Inn at SilverCreek in Granby, Colorado, October 10 - 12, for three days of seminars and classes.

The theme of the 19th Symposium was "Tsunami Time," referring to the continued wave of success that has been enjoyed by the instructors and students so far this year.  The CTI Black Belt Team, recently back from South Korea, the fantastic MSK Summer Expo, the exciting Camp MSK '14, the record breaking 40th CTI Superbowl and the other fantastic events preceding this year's symposium has had everyone operating at a high level.  The symposium participants took the theme and pushed hard throughout the weekend, continuing to ride this huge have of success.

The 19th MSK Symposium began on Friday evening with a special CTI Power Taekwondo workout that got everyone well warmed up!  Symposium participants got a taste of how the black belts train for sparring and enjoyed the lengthy, focused session.  Friday evening finished with lots of good work on self-defense techniques.

Saturday began at 6:00 AM for black belts who worked on poomse and staff poomse.  After a red belt workout, everyone participated in Sparring, Taegeuk and Chang-Hon poomse, and breaking with a concentration in judging technique.  After lunch, special evaluations were given to the participants lasting several hours which included; exercise, basics, poomse, one-step sparring, self-defense and board breaking.  To finish off the afternoon, each Campus practiced their Saturday evening demonstrations with the black belt band.  Then, it was time for rest.

Black Belt Nine played music for the Saturday Symposium Party as the tasty dinner was winding down.  The band, made up of nine MSK black belts, entertained everyone, including playing for each of the Campus Demonstrations.  Each Campus did an excellent job with their demos!  Also during the night, Dustin Wheeler, 4th dan, was recognized for his dedication to the CTI mission of education and MSK martial arts.

Sunday morning began with some black belt training in poomse and basic MSK Hapkido.  Instructor, Assistant Instructor and Campus Coordinator training classes followed taught by Masters Mindy Sautel, John Sautel and Erik Albrechtson.

Symposium Leaders:  Jim Sautel, 7th, Mindy Sautel, 6th, John Sautel, 6th, Erik Albrechtson, 5th, Freddy Sautel, 4th, Alice Meyung, 4th, Clayton Garner, 4th, Dustin Wheeler, 4th, Andy McDaniel, 3rd, Bridget Sautel, 3rd, Abdu Kikhia, 3rd and Michael Sandusky, 3rd.

To find out what a wonderful time it was, speak to someone who attended!

Friday, October 10, 2014

Adults! One Easy Way to Save Yourself Money

By Erik Albrechtson, 5th dan

Since the end of 2007 when the beginning of the “Great Recession” many families have been faced with making changes to accommodate new situations with their family income, living, etc. Families have needed to find ways to become frugal and save on items wherever possible. But we’ve got a great way to save yourself a lot of money- join the Colorado Taekwondo Institute!

You’re probably wondering how that’s going to save you money. Yes it’s going to cost money for classes (though we do offer a 30% or more multiple-family-member discount). But the money you will save will more than pay for the classes. And how can we save you money? Your health.

The number one preventable disease in the United States last year was heart disease.1 Heart disease can lead to a heart attack or stroke. According to a study done by CBS Money Watch, “the average total cost of a severe heart attack--including direct and indirect costs--is about $1 million. Direct costs include charges for hospitals, doctors and prescription drugs, while the indirect costs include lost productivity and time away from work.” The article goes on to say, “amortized over 20 years, that's $50,000 per year for a severe heart attack.”2

Fortunately, most of us have health insurance that will cover most of the costs. However the American Cancer Society estimates the “out-of-pocket costs for a patient who suffers a heart attack are $5,000 to more than $8,000 over the expected year of treatment.”3 Five thousand dollars over a year for the treatment! Classes for an entire year (or nearly 10,000 hours of instruction) at the CTI cost less than a third of that.

According to the University of Chicago, exercise can prevent heart disease. And they emphasize that the sooner you makes changes to your lifestyle the better.4 It seems like we can be so overwhelmed with everything we need to do in our daily lives we don’t have the time and/or money, but we need to put our own health as a top priority.

Classes at the Colorado Taekwondo Institute are great exercise, and they incorporate cardio, muscle toning and flexibility. Each of the 90-minute adult classes will give you a total encompassing workout, in a structured, positive and goal setting environment.

Another great benefit of classes at the CTI are the personal instruction you get in each class. The adult classes taught at each of the CTI campuses are taught by black belts with years of instructor training, so they are looking out for you to make sure not only you aren’t injured, but that you are getting the type of workout that you need. Any person has the ability to be successful in our program; even students with no previous martial arts training, are overweight, or have pre-existing injuries (bad knees, backs, etc.).

Do yourself a favor and call the CTI today. They have martial arts classes for adults, as well as kids and toddlers, that will be a huge benefit to your life. There are schools in Lakewood, Littleton, Westminster, Golden and Conifer. You won't regret it and your heart will thank you for it!


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1- http://thechart.blogs.cnn.com/2012/01/11/15-top-killers-of-americans/
2- http://www.cbsnews.com/news/how-much-would-a-heart-attack-cost-you/
3- http://action.acscan.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=11253&news_iv_ctrl=1321
4- http://www.uchospitals.edu/specialties/heart/services/prevention/prevent-CVD.html

Monday, October 6, 2014

Get Ready For Symposium!

The 19th MSK Black Belt Symposium starts this Friday evening! The event is being hosted at the Inn at SilverCreek, just outside of Granby, Colorado. Click here for a map to the hotel

Check-in will be between 5:00 and 6:00pm this Friday, with classes and advanced training to follow. 

Everyone is "riding the wave of success" that has been created from these incredible events in each and every class. attended  With the amazing amount of experiences gained so far this year, it's not just a wave but a Tsunami of success that we are negotiating!

Talk to your instructor if you have any questions. See you up there!

Friday, October 3, 2014

Confidence for Children - Get Involved with Martial Arts

By Emily Brophy, 1st dan

Taekwondo is a very beneficial sport for many reasons, and it helps with other activities such as school, singing, and acting. Because of the self-control and self respect that Taekwondo teaches, it is easier to be more involved in acting, or other forms of public performance. Public speaking is a very important part of everyday life, whether it is presenting in front of a class or acting in a musical or play. It can be very difficult for some people to present in front of people, participating in Taekwondo can provide the courage, and self confidence needed to be comfortable and good at public speaking, and acting. Because of the basics, poomse, and tournaments that go on at Taekwondo the self-confidence of the students is boosted. The boost of self-confidence helps in presenting in front of people, and acting, this can be an important skill for everyday life, and in jobs.

When I first started Taekwondo when I was 5, I was a very shy and not a very outgoing and personable person. I was also a piano player, which made it extremely for me to perform in recitals in front of people. I was unable to even introduce myself to the audience, and I was unable to perform. As I grew older, when I turned 7, I began to sing as well as play the piano, it was very nerve racking for me to play and sing in front of people. But as I became more into Taekwondo it was much easier for me to be able to sing in front of people. Taekwondo also helped me with acting as well, being in theater and having to act and sing in front of people as a different person, is a skill that takes time to perfect, and needs lots of self confidence. As well as performing a play or musical in front of an audience there are actor building games that are played. Some of these games can require a person to make a bold choice in character and then not break character, while performing a scene.  This can be  extremely hard for a shy person to find, and then trying to perform in front of people, can make it impossible for anything to be accomplished.

The way that the classes are taught, it requires class participating and practicing poomse in front of people. At first this can be a very difficult thing to accomplish, but as time goes on it becomes easier to be able to be self-confident.  During these classes also the students are taught about self-control and this also relates to acting, singing, and playing an instrument. Playing an instrument or acting in a show, requires a huge amount of practicing, and commitment. First learning how to play and instrument or keeping up playing on, can be a difficult and time consuming thing. One thing that is difficult for most people is wanting to practice on a regular basis. It takes a huge amount of self control to maintain a regular practice pattern. Playing a part in a musical or play whether it is a lead or a member of ensemble it a huge responsibility and requires a huge amount of rehearsal and practice time.  Being in a musical and being a member of ensemble is huge, depending on the amount of company music that there is and how much the ensemble is participating in, there can be a huge amount of dance steps to learn. The ensemble is the most important part of the play and it requires a huge amount of practice time to keep up with all of the new choreography.

Because of the self-control that is taught at Taekwondo, it makes it easier for me to be able to find the practice time to be part of a musical, or to be able to be a good performer when I sing and play the piano. During my recitals now I have found that I own the stage and I can do it if I put my mind to it. Taekwondo has been such a huge part of my life and it has helped me immensely to get me to stage I am now in performing and in life. I found it so much easier to  be who I am and talk to people without becoming nervous. During my last year in middle school, I was required to do a speech stating why I was ready to move on to high school. This speech was held at a dinner with the rest of the people from my class, and their families. About 100 people showed up to this dinner, and I knew that if I had not participated in Taekwondo I would have not been able to speak in front of all those people.